Welcome! I am a ceramic artist and art lover who is particularly fond of figurative sculpture and illustration, printmaking, historical fashion, vintage photos and illustration, and fairy tales. Enjoy!
“You specimen of beauty, now you are finished.” (Snow White & The Queen)
Sara E. MoralesCeramic & Mixed Media2012For WIP images, click here.
The tale of Snow White can be traced to oral traditions of antiquity.  Italian author Giambattista Basile recorded the earliest written version, which he titled “The Young Slave,” in 1684.  In 1812, German folklorists the Brothers Grimm revised “The Young Slave” into the story of “Schneewittchen” (“Little Snow White”), which became the tale readers know today.

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“You specimen of beauty, now you are finished.”
(Snow White & The Queen)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.

The tale of Snow White can be traced to oral traditions of antiquity.  Italian author Giambattista Basile recorded the earliest written version, which he titled “The Young Slave,” in 1684.  In 1812, German folklorists the Brothers Grimm revised “The Young Slave” into the story of “Schneewittchen (“Little Snow White), which became the tale readers know today.

“I’ll go this way and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first.” (Little Red Riding Hood & The Wolf)
Sara E. MoralesCeramic & Mixed Media2012For WIP images, click here.


The tale of Little Red Riding Hood originated in French folklore prior to the seventeenth century and was based on similar tales from other European countries.  The earliest printed version was “Le Petit Chaperon Rouge” (“Little Red Riding Hood”) from Stories or Tales from the Past, which was written by French author Charles Perrault in 1697.

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“I’ll go this way and go you that, and we shall see who will be there first.”
(Little Red Riding Hood & The Wolf)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.


The tale of Little Red Riding Hood originated in French folklore prior to the seventeenth century and was based on similar tales from other European countries.  The earliest printed version was “Le Petit Chaperon Rouge” (“Little Red Riding Hood”) from Stories or Tales from the Past, which was written by French author Charles Perrault in 1697.
“If you will bear all this, I will help you.” (The Little Mermaid & The Sea Witch)
Sara E. MoralesCeramic & Mixed Media2012For WIP images, click here.


Den lille havfrue (The Little Sea Worm) was written as a ballet by Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen in 1837.  The story became known as The Little Mermaid after multiple translations.  Andersen’s tale of heartbreak and sacrifice carries an emotional tone that has been lost in modern retellings.

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“If you will bear all this, I will help you.”
(The Little Mermaid & The Sea Witch)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.


Den lille havfrue (The Little Sea Worm) was written as a ballet by Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen in 1837.  The story became known as The Little Mermaid after multiple translations.  Andersen’s tale of heartbreak and sacrifice carries an emotional tone that has been lost in modern retellings.
“Promise me never to leave.” (Beauty & The Beast) 
Sara E. MoralesCeramic & Mixed Media2012
For WIP images, click here.
Historical Origins: The tale of Beauty and the Beast appears in numerous cultures around the world.  French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve wrote the earliest version as a novella for adults. It was titled “La Belle et la Bête” (“The Beauty and the Beast”) and was published in 1740.  Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont later revised De Villeneuve’s tale for a young women’s magazine.  This became the version that modern audiences recognize.

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“Promise me never to leave.”
(Beauty & The Beast)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.

Historical Origins: The tale of Beauty and the Beast appears in numerous cultures around the world.  French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve wrote the earliest version as a novella for adults. It was titled “La Belle et la Bête” (“The Beauty and the Beast”) and was published in 1740.  Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont later revised De Villeneuve’s tale for a young women’s magazine.  This became the version that modern audiences recognize.


“Mind everything I tell you, for if you do not I will make an end of you.” (Dorothy & The Wicked Witch of the West)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012
For WIP images, click here. 
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, which was written by American author Frank L. Baum in 1900, told the story of young Dorothy and her friends.  Numerous film and musical adaptations of Baum’s Oz series of books have popularized Dorothy’s adventure, securing her place as a fairy tale character.

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“Mind everything I tell you, for if you do not I will make an end of you.”
(Dorothy & The Wicked Witch of the West)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, which was written by American author Frank L. Baum in 1900, told the story of young Dorothy and her friends.  Numerous film and musical adaptations of Baum’s Oz series of books have popularized Dorothy’s adventure, securing her place as a fairy tale character.

“The Little Mermaid & The Sea Witch” 34” x 17.5” 2012 Ceramic & Mixed Media (There will be a dagger blade in the mermaid’s left hand shortly.)
This sculpture is part of my “Flowers & Daggers” series. The series will be on display at the Mobile Arts Council, in Mobile, AL through May. The reception will be Friday, May 11th, from 6 - 9pm, during ArtWalk. Everyone is welcome! 
You can find the event page for the reception here.

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The Little Mermaid & The Sea Witch”
34” x 17.5”
2012
Ceramic & Mixed Media (There will be a dagger blade in the mermaid’s left hand shortly.)

This sculpture is part of my “Flowers & Daggers” series. The series will be on display at the Mobile Arts Council, in Mobile, AL through May. The reception will be Friday, May 11th, from 6 - 9pm, during ArtWalk.
Everyone is welcome!

You can find the event page for the reception here.