Welcome! I am a ceramic artist and art lover who is particularly fond of figurative sculpture and illustration, printmaking, historical fashion, vintage photos and illustration, and fairy tales. Enjoy!
"Beauty" by Claudia Olds Goldie at the NCECA Biennial exhibition.

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"Beauty" by Claudia Olds Goldie at the NCECA Biennial exhibition.

"And can all the flowers talk?"

"In this new body of work I explore a process formulated in the studio that naturally removes all the pigment from the capillaries in rose petals. It is a complex procedure that over a period of days replaces the pigment with highly purified water leaving behind only the skeletal fibre and plant structure visible; all while the plant still lives and grows.

These beautifully detailed and painterly photographic works are captured underwater and presented ‘as shot’ without the use of post production either traditional or digital.

From the outset I wanted to take this instantly recognizable subject and re-present it in an entirely new and significant way. Originality of process is paramount, even with something as common place as a rose." - ‘Glass,’ by photographer Alexander James

“Promise me never to leave.” (Beauty & The Beast) 
Sara E. MoralesCeramic & Mixed Media2012
For WIP images, click here.
Historical Origins: The tale of Beauty and the Beast appears in numerous cultures around the world.  French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve wrote the earliest version as a novella for adults. It was titled “La Belle et la Bête” (“The Beauty and the Beast”) and was published in 1740.  Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont later revised De Villeneuve’s tale for a young women’s magazine.  This became the version that modern audiences recognize.

View in High Quality →

“Promise me never to leave.”
(Beauty & The Beast)

Sara E. Morales
Ceramic & Mixed Media
2012

For WIP images, click here.

Historical Origins: The tale of Beauty and the Beast appears in numerous cultures around the world.  French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve wrote the earliest version as a novella for adults. It was titled “La Belle et la Bête” (“The Beauty and the Beast”) and was published in 1740.  Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont later revised De Villeneuve’s tale for a young women’s magazine.  This became the version that modern audiences recognize.


"I dare say you never even spoke to Time!"

"Metamorphosis, transition, and evolution provide the common threads of the art of Anne Bachelier. The artist captivates her audience with compelling, highly imaginative images that are distinct, unique, inventive and immediately recognizable. Her metaphysical, dream-like fantasies evoke feelings simultaneously powerful, peaceful, and protective. This unique “other” world, untouched by time or place, reminds the viewer of the eternal dance of transformation and regeneration.” - CFM Gallery

Les Regrets

L’Art de la divination

Cette nuit…dans les hautes herbes

Les Gestes du mystere

Mad Tea Party, Illustration for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and What She Found There

Poetesse

Passe le temps sur la belle au bois dormant

Love.

Clarke on the relationship between Achilles and Patroclus in Homer’s The Iliad:

“More fundamentally, Achilles and Patroclus are not “friends”. They are lovers. Friendship is a limited relationship, in the sense that participants must meet on an equal plane to enjoy one another’s company within the limits of shared interests and mutual advantages. Love is by no means necessarily a relationship of equals; but it is an unlimited one, in the sense that participants accept, and are themselves free to express, every aspect of character and personality, whether these are amiable, useful, or not. Achilles is by nature short tempered and violent; Patroclus, gentle and passive. Patroclus accepts realistically what Achilles is, and refrains from exasperating it. In the same way, Achilles accepts Patroclus’ soft-heartedness without reproach, and allows himself to be compromised in similar circumstances. Both heroes endure and accommodate themselves to the extremes in each others character. That is the behavior of lovers, not friends.”

- W. M. Clarke, “Achilles and Patroclus in Love,” Hermes, Vol. 106 (1978): 391.

(Source: skinned-teen)

May 27th at 12AM / via: sluttypus / op: skinned-teen / tagged: art. fine art. beauty. art history. / reblog / 420,083 notes